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Crossway is our quarterly magazine, with news and comment on issues of Anglican evangelicalism. Selected articles are posted here.

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Jane Tooher

Posted by Jane Tooher, 6 Oct 2014

In the latest edition of Crossway, Jane Tooher looks at how a complementarian view of gender relationships is a positive encouragement for all kinds of ministry.

Some people believe that a complementarian position on the ministries of men and women, stifles women and stifles the church. But that’s not necessarily true. It depends on your working definition of complementarianism, and upon your practice.

I define gender complementarity (as per the Values of Moore College) as an ‘affirmation of the fundamental equality and mutual dependence of men and women as image bearers of God, while recognising proper differences in roles and responsibilities in life and Christian ministry.’ And it’s in our practice, more often than in our definitions, that complementarianism can be distorted.

Rightly understood and lived out, a complementarian position helps men and women recognize who they were created and redeemed to be, and it helps the people of God recognize the beauty of interdependence and the variety of gifting that God has given to build his church, as we take his great message of salvation of Jesus Christ to the ends of the world. Far from stifling, when properly understood, complementarianism liberates women as essential to the life and health of Christ’s church.

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Posted 2 Oct 2014

The autumn edition of Crossway has just been published, leading with a report on this year’s Junior Anglican Evangelical Conference (JAEC), which focused on seizing the opportunities of Church of England ministry.

Dr Tom Woolford, reporting on the JAEC event, says that it is ‘a conference which itches where others do not’, and tells how this year’s delegates left once again ‘with steel in their eyes and a spring in their step’.

Lee Gatiss’s talk from JAEC on evangelical strategy also features in the magazine. He argues that evangelicals are often double-minded about their commitment to the Church of England, and that just keeping our heads down in the local church is not a strategy for reforming or renewing the Church. (You can also listen to the audio of the full talk here.)

There is some food for thought on the doctrines of the atonement and predestination, and a significant article by Jane Tooher on how biblical complementarianism liberates women as essential to the life and health of Christ’s church. This article challenges complementarians, especially pastors, to equip and deploy more women for ministries in the church. Read it online here.

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Picture of the cover of Crossway

Posted 4 Jul 2014

The summer edition of Crossway has just been published, leading with a report on this year’s Church Society conference, with its unashamed focus on our commitment to the Church of England.

Newly elected Church Society Council member, Dr Andrea Ruddick, reporting on the conference, says: ‘After a day of stirring talks and news from the frontline, we went home with plenty of reasons to remain thoroughly positive about being reformed evangelicals within the Church of England.’

This new edition of Crossway also includes an interview with Dub Gannon, the new Vicar of six parishes in Essex and an article on the value and significance of biblical counselling by Sally Orwin Lee, who is on the Steering Committee of Biblical Counselling UK.

Meanwhile, John Simmons, Vicar of Christ Church Chadderton, shares the thinking behind why his church has become the latest parish to adopt Church Society as its patron, and Lee Gatiss asks, ‘What does “flourishing” actually mean?’ He says: ‘I believe there are courageous and creative solutions to the problem of our lack of representation in the college of bishops.’

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Photo of a mill in Chadderton

John Simmons

Posted by John Simmons, 4 Jul 2014

In this article from the latest edition of Crossway, John Simmons shares some of the thinking behind why his church has become the latest parish to adopt Church Society as its patron.

Blake’s words about ‘dark, satanic mills’ were not specifically about Oldham, but they could have described the Oldham of my childhood, surrounded as we were by over 360 mills.

The damp, gloomy atmosphere of this Pennine town, together with the coal mined here, provided ideal conditions for it to be the textile processing capital of the world. The parish of Christ Church Chadderton was founded in 1870 at the height of this industry as a clearly evangelical witness.

None of the mills spin these days, although many are still there. I’m back here now as the latest in a long line of evangelical incumbents. We are a parish of 15,000 today with 30 per cent of our folk being non-white, mostly of a Pakistani or Bangladeshi heritage, almost all of whom are active Muslims. How do you maintain evangelical ministry in this kind of setting?

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Photo by Gene Hunt